Are Science Careers Designed to Work Against Women?

Recent research by Cornell University reported in The Guardian, suggests that the small numbers of women in senior science posts is more to do with the lack of flexibility in career structures than, as previously thought, discrimination in the job application process. It’s not that women are being discriminated against, it’s more that they are making the choice that this lifestyle won’t suit them. As long term science posts are scarce, in order to keep the job you may need to put in long hours or work abroad, and because of this women are opting out. Effort should be directed at policy changes that reflect the challenges of women interested in a long term career in science. Offering part-time scientific posts for example, would help women keep their career going whilst bringing up a family. Athene Donald, a professor at Cambridge University – who I interviewed for my book Beyond The Boys’ Club – wrote in her own blog about the cultural issues women face in progressing a science career. She says men seem to be more aware of “women in science initiatives” in their department than the women they were designed to help! And unlike women, men are more likely to be appraised as a matter of course and have knowledge of promotion procedures, putting women at a disadvantage. As we working women know our many interests and commitments outside our working life make it impossible for us to sustain a career that offers no time away from our work. Find more on women in science here.

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