‘Why Innovation is the New Normal: How to Stay Ahead in the 21st Century’ – Networking lunch at Brown’s Courtrooms, London 24th Sep 2015

innovationAs it’s back to school time, I’m currently helping my step-daughter think through her career options – a tricky task for any parent. On the one hand you want them to pursue their dreams and on the other you want them to be practical. The truth is you can pursue your dreams – but they may look different from what your 6 year old self may have originally envisaged. I no longer pine to work with dolphins for example!
My daughter is great with people. Fittingly, she is currently a receptionist at one of the big accounting firms. However, she’s smart enough to know checking in for appointments will increasingly be done by iPad and one ‘uber-receptionist’ who handles all the tricky enquiries an iPad can’t. Unless she up-skills or becomes that ‘specialist’ receptionist, her job will become obsolete. This future is frightening and dystopian to many, but there are ways to prepare – and they lie in honing the skills that can’t be outsourced cheaper globally or done by a machine.
This is where women may have an advantage. Many of these key skills; communication, collaboration and creativity are areas in which women excel. The fastest growing jobs revolve around personal and health care leading the list as detailed in The Telegraph. We are heading towards a future where the safest jobs of yesterday: doctor, lawyer and accountant are changing so much they may become obsolete as we know them now. The trick is in taking yesterday’s ‘safe degree’ to become the specialist collaborative doctor, the creative and communicative lawyer- the trusted advisor accountant.
Preparing for this change and the constant up-skilling required to stay current will be a topic on which I’ll be speaking at the next lunch hosted by Lady Val: ‘Why Innovation is the the new normal: Staying ahead in the 21st century’ in London on Sept 24, 2015.  Lady Val’s lunches are part of an award winning network and are a fantastic atmosphere. Women from multiple professional backgrounds come together to meet like-minded ambitious women. Hope to see you there.

In fact, throughout the autumn, I’ll be speaking interactively at more events on a range of new topics including Personal Innovation, Female ‘Superpowers’ and Why the Smartest Guys get Diversity. If you are looking for a new presentation to truly engage your audiences, get in touch.

 

Women and even ‘feminine-faced’ men assumed to be poor negotiators

women negotiators

Women’s reticence to negotiate is often blamed for part of the gender pay gap, with naysayers claiming ‘you get what you ask for’. Yet more research shows that stereotypes about women who do attempt to negotiate are often a bigger part of the problem. The Journal of Organisational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes reported that people of both genders were more likely to want to negotiate against women - and even men who had feminine facial features.

This implies women, and even men with more feminine faces, are poor negotiators and therefore more appealing adversaries. The researchers at Cornell University found ‘people were systematically more aggressive to feminine featured faces – they were more demanding and would send in offers that compromised less. The only upside for women? Become a good negotiator and you’ll surprise the other side of the table – who clearly expect less from you.

Men confident, women competent- 95 studies prove the difference

imgresA client bristled when a male colleague described her as a perfectly ‘competent woman’. Hardly the most glowing of recommendations, but it turns out statistically – he was right. In an effort to unpick assumptions we make about male and female leaders, research published recently in the Journal of Applied Psychology looked at 95 separate previous studies and found no overall gender difference in the perceived effectiveness of leaders.

However, when they looked at who was making the judgement they found a significant difference. According to self-reports, men rated themselves more favourably than women rated themselves. However, when the judgement was in the eyes of others, women were perceived as more competent than their male colleagues. So men’s self-confidence was tops, but women were viewed as more competent by everyone around them. Female Breadwinners wonders how much further we’d get if 360 feedback was valued more than self-reports – which are clearly prone to unwarranted exaggeration and gender bias.

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