What M&S knows about women engineers that the Evening Standard could learn

34ROMA3103M&S ‘Leading Ladies’ campaign celebrates women of substance- the latest collection is aimed at the diverse women of modern Britain. While many faces are familiar, we like the introduction of Roma Agrawal. a structural engineer. Her impressive portfolio includes The Shard, London’s 87 storey skyscraper, Western Europe’s tallest building. Employed by WSP Group, she is currently involved in the remodelling of London Bridge. We are immediately impressed and intrigued by M&S’s choice to include a female engineer and curious about her background.

Agrawal grew up in India, with a father who was an electrical engineer, mother a computer designer, and sister an architect. She explained: “There’s less of a divide between girls’ and boys’ subjects in India than here. It’s normal there for girls to study science. I didn’t realise that a gender divide existed until I came to university at Oxford. I looked around the lecture theatre and there were about 10 girls in a class of 150. That’s when I thought this was kind of weird. We are designing things for society and if the people designing them only represent a small proportion of society we probably can’t deliver well.”

So why did Agrawal get involved with M&S? She wanted to highlight women engineers in the UK, currently standing at just 8%. She explained: “I loved that they had models and music stars alongside Doreen Lawrence and an engineer. It’s fantastic that M&S is reaching out to a whole new audience who might not have considered engineering before. It’s good for girls, and boys, to see engineers of all shapes, sizes and types doing amazing things, because anyone can do it. Even if you don’t like maths and physics.”

“As an engineer working to get more people, especially women, interested in maths, science and technical careers” Agrawal believes in the power of the media to attract strong talent and inspire the new generation of women to train in engineering.’” Unfortunately the media can also undermine great talent through it’s blatant sexism. An article written about Agrawal stated:

“This softly spoken 30-year-old in a yellow dress is the woman who made sure the biggest erection in Western Europe didn’t fall down”.

We doubt a reference to her clothing and male genitalia would have featured if the subject was a male engineer. Agrawal, BA MSc CEng MIStructE MIET is an Associate Structural Engineer at WSP, responded, “I would like to thank the Evening Standard for giving me such a wonderful opportunity to raise the profile of engineering and women in leadership, but next time, let’s do it without the penis jokes”. We at Female Breadwinners like her style.

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